Wednesday, October 18News That Matters

technology

16 Top Tips from Blogging Experts for Beginners

16 Top Tips from Blogging Experts for Beginners

technology
I’ve heard blogging referred to a couple of times recently as a mixture between an art and a science. If this is true (and I think it is), there’s no ‘right way’ to approach blogging if you want to be successful. There are plenty of people who’ve done a great job of it though, and I thought it would be useful to learn from them. These 16 bloggers shared one important tip each for blogging beginners. No doubt, even if you’re not a beginner these tips will probably prove to be useful. 1. Get ideas from your audience Create blog posts that answer the most interesting questions from people you engage with on social media. Dave Larson, founder of @tweetsmarter This can be a great way to gather ideas of what topics people would most like to read about, which will help your blog grow! 
100 Tips & Tricks Professional Bloggers Use to Make Their Job Easier

100 Tips & Tricks Professional Bloggers Use to Make Their Job Easier

technology
The one area of content creation I hear the most pushback on, however, is blogging. So, I wanted to do a deep-dive on little hacks that make bloggers' lives easier. I wracked my brain -- and the brain of a few blogging colleagues -- to come up with this epic list for you. It's broken out into the following sections, so feel free to skip to the ones that align best with your pain points: Coming Up With Post Ideas Blogging More Efficiently Making Writing Easier Improving Content Quality Improving Your Editing Process Optimizing the Performance of Your Posts Finding Quick Sources of Blog Content Fun Little Tricks Maintaining Your Overall Sanity Parting Advice Alright. 100 blogging tips from professional bloggers. Let's do this. Coming Up With Post ...
Hands-on with Play-Doh Touch, the app that brings kids’ creations to life

Hands-on with Play-Doh Touch, the app that brings kids’ creations to life

entertainment, News, technology
Play-Doh has come to the iPad. With the newly launched toy set for kids, Play-Doh Touch Shape to Life Studio, Hasbro has made a solid attempt at bringing the joy of Play-Doh to digital through an iOS app that brings kids’ creations to life. But the combination of physical play and digital is not a skill set that’s easily mastered even by top kids’ brands — just ask Disney Infinity. And while Play-Doh itself holds up as the engaging and fun toy it’s been for decades, the Play-Doh Touch app fails to amuse after only a few minutes. On paper, Play-Doh Touch sounds intriguing. The idea is that kids can use Play-Doh to create as always – using scissors, stamps and molds – then place their resulting creations on a white surface where they’re scanned and ported into a digital world wh
Apple launches repair program for iPhone 6 Plus ‘touch disease’ flaw

Apple launches repair program for iPhone 6 Plus ‘touch disease’ flaw

hot, technology
Apple has launched a new repair program for a widely reported on iPhone 6 Plus hardware malfunction known as “touch disease,” which renders the touchscreen useless and manifests as a thin grey line at the top the display. According to Apple, however, this flaw is caused by dropping the phone repeatedly. The company says it will not cover the cost of a repair and will ask those affected by the issue to pay $149 to have it fixed. That might not sit too well with the iPhone owners who filed class action lawsuits against Apple over the touch disease issue. “Apple has determined that some iPhone 6 Plus devices may exhibit display flickering or Multi-Touch issues after being dropped multiple times on a hard surface and then incurring further stress on the device,” the company writes on its
Student’s iDentifi app puts object recognition in the hands of the visually impaired

Student’s iDentifi app puts object recognition in the hands of the visually impaired

hot, News, technology
For someone who is blind or partially sighted, everyday tasks can be a pain — choosing the right can from the pantry, for instance, or picking up the right book from the table. A smartphone could help them with this kind of problem, of course, if it knew how to identify objects and describe them to the user — which is precisely what this app from a 12th-grade student from Toronto does. iDentifi, out now and free on iOS, lets users point the camera at an object and receive a description of it shortly after: “Red headphones,” or “a bottle of Darigold milk on a wood table.” It isn’t the only app out there that can tell what it’s looking at, but it has the advantage of being aimed at visually impaired users and multiple languages from the start. Anmol Tukrel began working on it a year a